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Colorado ISD planning new bond proposal for May

By Jenna Rogers, Reporter, jrogers@ktxs.com
Published On: Nov 09 2012 06:16:54 PM CST

COLORADO CITY, TX -

Colorado Independent School District says they are not giving up after the nearly 30 million dollar bond to improve schools in was defeated in the election on Tuesday.

Reggy Spencer, Superintendent of Colorado ISD, said the bulk of the bond money would have gone to consolidating schools and getting rid of the old buildings. Although the proposition failed this time, they're pushing forward with a new one.

Spencer is hopeful the revised edition will change voters minds by May. Opposition to the expensive bond for Colorado schools called it "full of fluff," citing unnecessary improvements to the high school football field. Spencer said he is adamant. Something needs to be done about the state of the district's run down schools.

"We won't stop fighting for the kids and I won't give up," said Spencer.

The new bond proposal would cost the average homeowner in Colorado City just 40 cents a day. Administrators say that change would make a world of difference for kids at Hutchinson Elementary School. 

Charlotte Stovall, the Principal of the school, says people have been walking through those doors for nearly a century. She's hoping that there will be less resistance with the revised bond, and she's urging the community to take notice of the need for new facilities for the students.

"I don't think you can put a price tag on what we should offer our children for the future," she said.

Classrooms are crowded, technology is behind, and appliances are outdated.
Spencer said the news hit the students hardest.

"I said we're gonna go back at it in May. They said 'you promise?' And I said 'I can't promise it'll pass, but I promise we'll try for you,'" said Spencer.

Spencer estimates that the new bond proposal will be reduced to about 21 million dollars.