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Court rules same-sex marriage can resume in California

Published On: Jun 26 2013 09:51:17 AM CDT
Updated On: Jun 26 2013 02:58:40 PM CDT
Supreme Court

Floyd Yarmuth/CNN

The Supreme Court dismissed the appeal of the Ninth Circuit ruling, ruling the appealing parties did not have the standing to do so. The action essentially allows same-sex marriage to resume in California.

WASHINGTON (CNN) -

The Supreme Court has dismissed a closely-watched appeal over same-sex marriage on jurisdictional grounds, ruling Wednesday private parties do not have "standing" to defend California's voter-approved ballot measure barring gay and lesbians couples from state-sanctioned wedlock. The ruling permits same-sex couples in California to legally marry.

It was the second victory of the day for advocates of same-sex marriage.

Earlier, a divided Supreme Court struck down a key part of the Defense of Marriage Act, the congressional law that denies to legally married same-sex couples the same benefits provided to heterosexual spouses.

DOMA defines marriage as only between a man and a woman.

Both votes were 5-4.

"Although Congress has great authority to design laws to fit its own conception of sound national policy, it cannot deny the liberty protected by the Due Process Clause of the Fifth Amendment," said Justice Anthony Kennedy.

The case examined whether the federal government can deny tax, health and pension benefits to same-sex couples in states where they can legally marry. At issue was whether DOMA violates equal protection guarantees in the Fifth Amendment's due process clause as applied to same-sex couples legally married under the laws of their states.

The key plaintiff is Edith "Edie" Windsor, 84, who married fellow New York resident Thea Spyer in Canada in 2007, about 40 years into their relationship. By the time Spyer died in 2009, New York courts recognized same-sex marriages performed in other countries. But the federal government didn't recognize Windsor's same-sex marriage, and she was forced to assume an estate tax bill much larger than those that other married couples would have to pay. So, Windsor sued the federal government.

A federal appeals court last year ruled in Windsor's favor, saying DOMA violated the Constitution's equal protection clause.

"Today's DOMA ruling is a historic step forward for #MarriageEquality. #LoveIsLove," President Barack Obama's official Twitter account posted soon after the decision was handed down.

The case is U.S. v. Windsor (12-307).